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 Beginnings of the TEMPEST
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mwpowell
Starting member

USA
6 Posts

Posted - 01/09/2003 :  17:43:21  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Family tradition has passed down accounts of our emigrating ancestors as passengers on the TEMPEST. According to family historians, they sailed for America immediately after their wedding (in Corwen, Wales) which ocurred April 26, 1851 . Our female ancestor was voted "the prettiest lady on board" and was awarded a dozen silver spoons, which she handed out to mothers of sick children for their medicine during this "six week journey".

This becomes a mystery.

According to your records, the TEMPEST was launched by Handysides & Co. in Dec. 1854 as a sailing ship. It became a member of the Anchor Line and was reported as "never heard of" after her 1857 voyage from New York. Is it possible to get the "pre-Handysides & Co" records? I am still looking for the port the TEMPEST sailed to and a passenger list. Thanks in advance.
Marilyn
Orange Texas, USA

Borge
Veteran Moderator

Norway
1263 Posts

Posted - 01/09/2003 :  19:29:43  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hi Marilyn

You input regarding the Tempest is quite interesting, what more can you tell us about that voyage? Checking out the splendid work of R. S. McLellan - "Anchor Line 1856-1956", published in 1956, I find the following interesting remarks:

A history published forty-five years ago is sadly astray regarding the Tempest. There it was stated that she was "acquired" in 1853, and in 1855 she "was purchased from her former owners". There is also a reference to her having been employed in the Canadian trade. In view of this it is desirable to make it clear that the Tempest was built by Sandeman & McLaurin in 1855 to the order of Handysides & Co., and that her one and only voyage as a sailing ship was to Bombay

Could there be two ships by the same name, or is there an other unknown explanation. The Lloyd's register of ships could be the source we should check, though it is not easy to get access to.

Børge Solem

Edited by - Borge on 01/09/2003 19:30:44
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mwpowell
Starting member

USA
6 Posts

Posted - 04/09/2003 :  02:55:04  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Perhaps the history is NOT 'sadly astray", but is not quite all there! In re-reading R. S. McLellan's account, it begins to sound that there could be two ships of that name. Information I've come across through your webpages has the Tempest sailing from New York on Feb. 13, 1857 with crew and "one" passenger. Another account has the "Tempest sailing Feb. 26, 1857 with a crew and passengers totaling one hundred and fifty all told. Never heard from again" - The Anchor Line.
So how could one ship make two journeys so close together?

How do you, I, we check the Lloyd's register of ships? Even with the remaining mystery, your web pages have been enlightening. Thank you, Borge!

Marilyn
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Borge
Veteran Moderator

Norway
1263 Posts

Posted - 04/09/2003 :  20:09:25  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I think we can be prety sure that there were only one ship named Tempest in the Anchor Line service in 1857. It is mnore likely that one of the sources are wrong. Below is what is written in R. S. McLellan's - "Anchor Line 1856-1956", page 18 - 20:

" So far the company had owned only sailing ships, trading to any port where inducement offered and with no semblance of a regular line. It would appear, however, that the aim still was to enter the North Atlantic trade with steamships, and to this end the Tempest was scheduled for conversion to a steamer. Having arrived at Liverpool at the end of 1855, on her return from Bombay, the probability is that she reached Glasgow some time in January, for by May she was being advertised as due to sail for New York early in July. Here for the first time the title of Anchor Line was used, and in connection with the Atlantic service only. It was not until 1863 that the title was used for the Mediterranean service. The announcement was headed: Anchor Line of Steam Packet Ships sailing regularly between Glasgow and New York. Two ships were shown, the Tempest and John Bell. Here is another ship which has wrongly been listed as an Anchor liner. The John Bell was owned by a Glasgow merchant of that name, was built in 1854 and employed in the Australian trade until converted to steam in 1857. Similar to the Tempest, but somewhat larger, she sailed in the Anchor Line Atlantic service from 1859 until 1863 when she was sold, but at no time did she belong to the company. Work on the Tempest was held up, or the conversion took longer than had been anticipated, for after two announcements all advertising for her ceased and was not resumed for some months. Eventually she sailed from Glasgow on 11th October, 1856, the first sailing in the Anchor Line Glasgow - New York service. Her performance was by no means spectacular as she did not arrive in New York until 8th November, twenty-eight days on the passage; but on the whole it was not bad for a vessel of her size and power making a westbound crossing in winter. Leaving New York on 19th November she made the return passage in twenty-four days. Everything seemed set fair for the realisation of Thomas Henderson's ambition. The service had been opened, the John Bell was to join up, and a steamer was on the stocks and due for delivery the following year. John Henderson came ashore to stand by the new tonnage, and on 27th December the Tempest went down the river on her second voyage, with James Morris in command. She cleared from the Tail of the Bank, Greenock, the following day with a full general cargo and fifty passengers. At noon that day she was reported off the Mull of Galloway "steamming very fast ". Bad weather was encountered, for a newspaper report expressed " gratification at learning from the Arnerican intelligence last week of the safe arrival of the Clyde and the Tempest, in first rate order ". (The Clyde belonged to the Clyde Stearn Packet Companyand, it may be mentioned, was at that time in command of David Henderson, the eldest of the four Henderson brothers.) THE NEW YORK HERALD reported the arrival of the Tempest on 1st February " having encountered strong westerly gales and boisterous weather ". On 13th February, 1857, she left New York for Glasgow with a full cargo and one passenger, and was never heard of again. To go back a littIe, the last sailing ship to be built for the Company, the Dalhousie, was delivered in October, 1856, and sailed for Valparaiso a month later. It was planned to engage in the Quebec and Montreal service during the 1857 summer season. Their new steamer, the United Kingdom, was launched and fitting out; the John Bell was being converted to stearn; and with the Tempest to make a third there was hope of a regular service every three weeks. News travelled slow ly in those days and it was some weeks after the Tempest was due in Glasgow that she was given up as lost. There had always been the possibility that because of the loss of her propeller (by no means uncommon at that period) or engine failure she was continuing the voyage under sail."

Note that there was no Anchor Line prior to 1855. If they sailed on a ship named Tempest in 1851 it must have been another ship, or R. S. McLellan made an error in claiming it was built in 1855 (Dec. 54). About the last voyage of the ship, what is your source for the date of departure from New York in 1857?

The Lloyd registers are available at some museums and libraries, BUT ARE SCARSE.

Børge Solem

Edited by - Borge on 04/09/2003 20:11:27
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mwpowell
Starting member

USA
6 Posts

Posted - 05/09/2003 :  01:05:16  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
'NEVER HEARD OF.'
MYSTERIES OF THE ATLANTIC FERRY.
(Presented by C. L. Davis, Esq., 1900)


"Only five months later the steamship Tempest, of the Anchor Line, was added to the increasing list of mysterious disappearances on the Atlantic. She sailed on 26th February 1857, with a crew and passengers numbering one hundred and fifty all told, and was never seen again. It was with the Tempest that the Anchor Line began its service between Glasgow and New York. " from…The Ships List The url is <http://www.theshipslist.com/ships/Wrecks/never.htm>
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mwpowell
Starting member

USA
6 Posts

Posted - 05/09/2003 :  01:15:43  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Sorry, Borge, I "submitted" the above reply before I meant to respond to your last reply. Is it possible that the Tempest was privately owned before Handysides & Co. "launched" it as one of their line, keeping the name? I have viewed the marriage records in the Welsh church which lists their marriage date of 1851. So am puzzled by these later dates.

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Brining
Norway Heritage Veteran

USA
868 Posts

Posted - 05/09/2003 :  02:17:31  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
There are a couple of referances to a ship Tempest
Source: The Famine Immigrants Arriving at New York 1846-1851 (7 vols)
CHESTNUT, MARGARET (35), ANDREW (12), ISABELLA (8), JANE (5), WILLIAM (2), SUSAN (4mth) on ship Tempest from Liverpool on 5 Dec 1850.

and this page has several passengers listed as arriving on the Tempest in 1851 http://www.obrienclan.com/ships/at/famine-7.htm
Look at lines 323 324 and 719

It looks like your passenger list would be in The Famine Immigrants [Vol. VII] Here is a site that lists it unfortunately out of stock but you might be able to find it in a library http://www.genealogical.com/item_detail.asp?ID=2217
Carla
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mwpowell
Starting member

USA
6 Posts

Posted - 05/09/2003 :  06:59:00  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Carla, not only did you find proof that the Tempest actually existed in 1851, but that it arrived in New York approximately six weeks or so, after the wedding of the Roberts' in northern Wales, as noted in family legend! Hugs to you. Now, I'll track a copy of the Famine Immigrants Vol VII !
Thanks a bunch!
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Borge
Veteran Moderator

Norway
1263 Posts

Posted - 05/09/2003 :  19:02:10  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
That's great Marilyn, I'ts amazing what Carla is able to dig up !
Please keep us posted if you find any more information about that 1851 ship!
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mwpowell
Starting member

USA
6 Posts

Posted - 07/09/2003 :  05:20:53  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
According to the information from Carla concerning the Famine Immigrants from Ireland, the Tempest made another journey from Liverpool arriving at the port of New York City on October 18, 1851 (Vol VII). Only O'Brien, Bryan, Brien, etc are listed as requested by the editors Glazier & Teppler (pub. 1986).
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Brining
Norway Heritage Veteran

USA
868 Posts

Posted - 07/09/2003 :  06:18:03  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by mwpowell

According to the information from Carla concerning the Famine Immigrants from Ireland, the Tempest made another journey from Liverpool arriving at the port of New York City on October 18, 1851 (Vol VII). Only O'Brien, Bryan, Brien, etc are listed as requested by the editors Glazier & Teppler (pub. 1986).


Booo but at least you know the records exist and should be available on microfilm from either the NARA Click Here
or a LDS location. Not as easy as finding it on line, I wonder if someday everything will be?
Carla
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michael_pocock
New on board

USA
2 Posts

Posted - 13/02/2006 :  04:40:39  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
One curious thing I found on the Tempest page. It shows a sailing from Glasgow on Jan. 27, 1857 arriving in New York Feb. 1. This surely must have been a blue riband winner as the previous voyage took 28 days. Is there a mistake here?
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Borge
Veteran Moderator

Norway
1263 Posts

Posted - 13/02/2006 :  21:34:22  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
You are right, that record would be hard to beat even nowadays. The correct date for the departure is Dec. 27, 1856. The database has been updated.

Børge Solem
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michael_pocock
New on board

USA
2 Posts

Posted - 17/02/2006 :  16:03:06  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Glad I could be of some help.
Michael
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