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 Hannah Parr deaths
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dwssnell
Medium member

USA
118 Posts

Posted - 08/05/2020 :  05:20:16  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
My g. g. grandparents, their three daughters, and the wife's father, my ggg grandfather, were on the Hannah Parr. They are listed on under #75, Ellev Erlandsen Torgersrud, Ronoug Hansdatter, Matia Ellefsdatter (my g grandmother) Christine Ellefsdatter, Hanna Ellefsdatter. and Hans Olsen Torgersrud (Ronoug's father). The two younger daughters died on the journey. Are there any death records that can be obtained for passengers who died at sea, or in port while they were in Limerick? My Grandmother, who was the daughter of Matia, told me that when the baby died she was buried at sea, and other passengers had to hold onto the mother, to keep her from jumping in the ocean after the baby. Matia named my grandmother Hannah after the ship.

jkmarler
Norway Heritage Veteran

USA
6757 Posts

Posted - 08/05/2020 :  08:34:35  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Lots of Hannah Parr stuff on this site:
http://www.norwayheritage.com/p_list.asp?jo=708

Footnote from the Iver Iverson Ruud account:
"[5] There is no Elev Torgersen in the passenger lists, but there is an Elev Torgersrud from Gausdal. Tradition in that family is that two Torgersrud daughters, Kjerstine (3 years old) and Hanna (6 months old), died during the journey. The records of St. Munchin's indicate three Norwegian children were buried; one is called only "a Norwegian child." Two are named: Andrea Eriksdatter" and "Edward Eriksen." They probably are the two children of Andreas Eriksen (Andrea Andreasdatter and Edvart Andreasen); the parish record keeper may not have understood Norwegian naming conventions. Andreas Eriksen and family were from Søndre Aurdal, Valdres. "

Edited by - jkmarler on 08/05/2020 08:45:09
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lyndal40
Norway Heritage Veteran

USA
8003 Posts

Posted - 08/05/2020 :  18:12:42  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I have seen cases where on either the first page or on the last page of the passenger manifest a note is made on passenger who died at sea. On the manifest for the Hannah Parr from Ancestry.com I did not see any such note.

Here is the section for the passenger who have listed above.

[url=https://postimages.org/][/url]
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dwssnell
Medium member

USA
118 Posts

Posted - 08/05/2020 :  18:34:03  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by lyndal40

I have seen cases where on either the first page or on the last page of the passenger manifest a note is made on passenger who died at sea. On the manifest for the Hannah Parr from Ancestry.com I did not see any such note.

Here is the section for the passenger who have listed above.

[url=https://postimages.org/][/url]

Yes, that is my family. Christine and Hanna were the two daughters who died on the trip.
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dwssnell
Medium member

USA
118 Posts

Posted - 08/05/2020 :  18:38:41  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Christine and Hanna were the two daughters that died on the trip. Family lore is that the baby died at sea.
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jwiborg
Norway Heritage Veteran

Norway
4739 Posts

Posted - 08/05/2020 :  20:42:39  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hannah Parr left Norway on Easter Eve 1868 (April 11th) with 380 passengers. The passengers:
  • 142 men
  • 113 women age above 14 yrs old
  • 45 boys age between 1-14
  • 66 girls age between 1-14
  • 8 boys under 1 yrs old
  • 6 girls under 1 yrs old
A majority of the passengers were from Faaberg, Gausdal, Øyer and Søndre Aurdal.
Among the passengers where one couple with triplets (3 girls age 10) and 6 more kids. In addition, they had twins who died before emigration, and two more (adults) who did not join them on the Hannah Parr. 13 children...

On its way to Quebec, the ship broke down (masts broke), and it had to seek port of refuge in Limerick, Ireland on May 7th.

As on many other emigrantships at that time; the passengers had to keep their own board during the journey, and this unexpected stop in Limerick led to a shortage of food.
The shipowner arranged food for the passengers while Hannah Parr were being repaired, thinking that the Norwegian government would reimburse him.
But he was wrong, and took the case to court. It went all the way up in the norwegian court system. The government at that time were in the belief that the country should not pay for poor Norwegians who had left their home country. The shipowner lost in all courts, all they way up to an unanimous decision in Supreme Court.

The ship finally arrived Quebec on July 28th.
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jwiborg
Norway Heritage Veteran

Norway
4739 Posts

Posted - 08/05/2020 :  22:16:14  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
A major sidetrack, but the above mentioned couple with 13 children is Ole Andersen Liumstuen and Olia Østensdatter. I actually found 15 kids... Quite an achievement to have triplets and two set of twins.

Johannes 1848
Johanne 1849
Anders twin 1852
Andreas twin 1852
Berthe 1854
Simen 1855
Østine triplet 1857
Oline triplet 1857
Christine triplet 1857
Olaus twin 1859
Thonetha twin 1859
Oliane 1862
Niels 1864
Agnethe 1865
Matias 1868

Edited by - jwiborg on 08/05/2020 22:16:57
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dwssnell
Medium member

USA
118 Posts

Posted - 09/05/2020 :  16:39:24  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I know the two younger girls died during the voyage and that my g. grandmother, Mathia, was the survivor. I heard the story many times from my grandmother, Hannah Larson Enger, who was the daughter of Mathia. As you can see, my grandmother was named after the ship that her mother came to America on.
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Kåarto
Norway Heritage Veteran

Norway
5825 Posts

Posted - 09/05/2020 :  22:10:45  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
A lot of Hannah Parr info from the 1868 voyage here

Edited by - Kåarto on 09/05/2020 22:12:00
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dwssnell
Medium member

USA
118 Posts

Posted - 09/05/2020 :  23:26:08  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
You would think that in the matter of deaths they would have kept better records, especially for children.. Maybe it was because of the distraction of the shipwreck. It is possible that the two children died at sea either before or after Limerick.
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