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 Sarah Larkin born Cecilia Larsdatter
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jkmarler
Norway Heritage Veteran

USA
7771 Posts

Posted - 29/04/2024 :  02:50:30  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Here is a Sarah who came in 1876 and lives at Maywood, Illinois in 1900:
https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MS7J-P86
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AntonH
Norway Heritage Veteran

USA
9242 Posts

Posted - 29/04/2024 :  03:54:44  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Probably the marriage of your Sarah.

William W. Nelles
in the Cook County, Illinois, U.S., Marriages Index, 1871-1920

Name William W. Nelles
Age 40
Gender Male
Birth Year abt 1846
Marriage Type Marriage
Marriage Date 21 Feb 1886
Marriage Place Chicago, Cook, Illinois
Spouse Name Sarah Ludvigsen
Spouse Age 31
Spouse Gender Female
FHL Film Number 1030153

Sarah as a widow in 1910


Sarah Nellis
Census • United States Census, 1910

https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MKH2-YP5

Edited by - AntonH on 29/04/2024 04:03:01
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jkmarler
Norway Heritage Veteran

USA
7771 Posts

Posted - 29/04/2024 :  09:32:25  Show Profile  Reply with Quote

A death record from ILSOS pre 1916 deaths
NELLIS, WILLIAM W 1907-05-22 COOK COUNTY 63 YR U 00002152 COOK
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ToreL
Advanced member

Norway
827 Posts

Posted - 29/04/2024 :  09:35:41  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Skjøte means deed. Værfar means father in law.
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carl johnson
Medium member

USA
92 Posts

Posted - 29/04/2024 :  15:39:13  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by AntonH

Here is a lady born in Norway named Sarah V Larson. Married an Ole Melling . Lived in Chicago and Woodstock at one time or another. Interesting since she has a daughter named Cecelia. Lots of her background does not fit but the first Sarah I have seen that was worth pursuing.

Sarah Melling
in the Illinois, U.S., Deaths and Stillbirths Index, 1916-1947
Name Sarah Melling
[Sarah Larson]
Birth Date 17 Jun 1857
Birth Place Stavanger, Norway
Death Date 5 Nov 1944
Death Place Chicago, Cook, Illinois
Burial Date 8 Nov 1944
Burial Place River Grove, Cook, lIllinois
Cemetery Name Elmwood Pk.
Death Age 87
Occupation Housewife
Race White
Marital Status W
Gender Female
Residence Chicago, Cook, Illinois
Father Name William Larson
Father Birth Place Stvanger, Norway
Mother Birth Place Stvanger, Norway
Spouse Name Ole Melling
FHL Film Number 1983254

Sarah Malling
Census • United States Census, 1900

https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MS35-BYW

Here is the Siscilia of interest in 1865

https://www.digitalarkivet.no/census/person/pf01038235003705

Probably this lady and the wrong person unfortunately

Name Siri
Record Type dåp (Baptism)
Birth Date 15 Juni
Baptism Date 12. jul 1857 (12 Jul 1857)
Baptism Place Vikedal, Rogaland, Norge (Norway)
Baptism Municipality Imsland
Father
Viar Larsen
Mother
Martha Halvorsdt.

https://www.digitalarkivet.no/view/255/pd00000010418626






The first of the two is very interesting but specific enough that after some investigation, I feel she is not my great aunt.
Thank you so much for continuing to help in the search!
Since she came to North America around 1875 and was in a biography from approximately 1902 it seems like she settled in Illinois for the duration of her life and was living in Illinois circa 1900 until death? Such a mystery!

carl johnson
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carl johnson
Medium member

USA
92 Posts

Posted - 29/04/2024 :  16:16:13  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by AntonH

Probably the marriage of your Sarah.

William W. Nelles
in the Cook County, Illinois, U.S., Marriages Index, 1871-1920

Name William W. Nelles
Age 40
Gender Male
Birth Year abt 1846
Marriage Type Marriage
Marriage Date 21 Feb 1886
Marriage Place Chicago, Cook, Illinois
Spouse Name Sarah Ludvigsen
Spouse Age 31
Spouse Gender Female
FHL Film Number 1030153

Sarah as a widow in 1910


Sarah Nellis
Census • United States Census, 1910

https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MKH2-YP5




In researching, this is what I found about Sarah-Silla?
[https://www.myheritage.com/research/record-10937-92007/silla-ludvigsen-in-1870-norway-census#fullscreen]

Household
NAME BIRTH
Johan Wold 1823
Jacobine Wold 1843
Silla Ludvigsen 1855
Ole Hansen 1861

carl johnson
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carl johnson
Medium member

USA
92 Posts

Posted - 29/04/2024 :  16:51:34  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by jkmarler

Here is a Sarah who came in 1876 and lives at Maywood, Illinois in 1900:
https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MS7J-P86



Looking at this, it is probably the Sarah Nellis, whose husband William died in 1907

I will keep investigating her but my instincts tell me this is not her

carl johnson
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carl johnson
Medium member

USA
92 Posts

Posted - 29/04/2024 :  20:41:03  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by ToreL

Skjøte means deed. Værfar means father in law.



Thank you

carl johnson
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AntonH
Norway Heritage Veteran

USA
9242 Posts

Posted - 01/05/2024 :  01:55:36  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Yes I think that the Sarah Neller is a Silla Ludvigsen b 1855 and not your Cecilia.
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carl johnson
Medium member

USA
92 Posts

Posted - 10/05/2024 :  17:44:16  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
It took me a bit to find the obituary that mentions John’s sister Sarah living in Chicago, but here is his obituary. The major difference between this and John’s biography that mentions Sarah, is instead of just being Sarah Larkin she is referred to as Sarah Larkins in Chicago in 1907.

John J Larson



JOHN LARSON IS SUDDENLY KILLED

While Turning Large Touring Car He Sends It Over Em-bankment On Lake Samish Road-G. C. Hyatt and Dr. D. F. Biggs, Are Uninjured.
LARSON HIT BY WHEEL
Apparently Not Seriously Injured, But Dies While On Way to Town In a Carriage.


John J. Larson, proprietor of the Larson Livery and Transfer company, received injuries from which he died a few hours later, shortly before 11 o'clock last night, when he attempted to turn his big automobile around on a narrow strip of road near Lake Samish.
The auto plunged over a forty-foot embankment, fatally injuring Mr. Larson, who was at the wheel, and the severely shaking up Glen C. Hyatt, vice president and general manager of the B. B. I. company, and Dr. D. E. Biggs, both of whom were in the tonneau at the time of the accident.
The accident occurred on the Lake Samish road, not far from the lake, at about 10:45 o'clock.
Mr. Hyatt sustained a severe nervous shock, but when seen in his room at an early hour this morning he stated that he was not injured in any way except for the shock naturally following such a harrowing experience, and that he would be confined to his room only for the day. Dr. Biggs escaped without injury, and was able to lend medical assistance to Mr. Larson, whom he at first thought would recover within a reasonably short time.
Mr. Larson died on the way to the hospital while seated in the buggy with the doctor, and he made no statement to any one of the party.
Mr. Larson was driving his own machine and had been running at a moderate rate of speed. When he came to the fork in the road, not far from the lake he decided to return to the city. He left the machine and carefully surveyed the ground in order to see if the turn could be made successfully.
As the machine was party turned in the road, the engine reversed and began to back and passed over the wall in a second's time.

"The brake refused to work," was Mr. Larson's only remark, when the men were able to extricate themselves from the wreckage.
Mr. Larson was partly successful in getting from under the steering wheel, but tinally succumbed to the great pain, and the men were forced to lift the heavy machine from his body. It is thought that the steering gear caused internal injuries, so that death was due to hemorrhages.
In giving a short description of the accident today, Mr. Hyatt said:
"It was done so quickly that one could not think to jump, and I thought we had not fallen more than ten feet.”
Examination afterward proved that the bank was all of forty feet high.

Mr. Larson was suffering and needed the doctor's care, so that it was left for me to get help as soon as possible.
"I was a long time finding a farmhouse at which to telephone to the city, and it was two hours before the driver from Mr. Larson's stable reached us. We came to the city as fast as possible, but were astonished when the doctor stated that Mr. Larson was dead. The body was brought on to the hospital and the doctor and I came home."

The uninjured men attribute their own escape from death to the fact that the car formed an arch above them, protecting them from the broken machinery.
The party left Mr. Hyatt's office a little before 9 o'clock in the evening, and the impromptu invitation to take a ride was given by Mr. Larson, who was passing the office just as his two friends came down the steps to the street.
As Mr. Hyatt stepped into the car he made a remark concerning the trip, adding:
"It is nice to have a driver that one can trust."
Mr. Hyatt stated that he reposed great faith in his friend's ability to handle the machine.
Both Mr. Hyatt and Dr. Biggs express surprise at the sudden demise of Mr. Larson, for although he seemed seriously hurt, he was rational and Insisted that he was not hurt badly.
After the first few minutes he could help himself a little in climbing the embankment,
and told the men repeatedly that he was not hurt as badly as they thought he was. ried on a general conversation until after they entered the buggy, but only made an occasional remark afterward.
William Galloway, who was acting as driver on the return trip, said this morning that he was only two miles from the main part of South Bellingham when the doetor announced the death.

No attention was pald to the wrecked machine by any of the party but it is thought to be nearly a total wreck. It was practically a new four-cylinder Cadillac.
The road on which the accident occurred is one noted for its grand scenery, but is considered a very poor thoroughfare for large muchines.


John J Larson has been a resident of this city for 18 years having come here from Norway in 1889. For the past 12 years, he has been proprietor of the Larson Livery and Transfer on the corner of Elk and Magnolia streets and has always been prominent in the fraternal affairs . His brother, William Larson, whose home is at 2407 Williams St. is the manager of the Livery. Mr. Larson was married in the city 15 years ago and now has three children, one daughter and two sons
Ruth aged nine years, Alvin aged seven years and Eduan aged three years. Mr. Larson‘s parents are both living and make their home in Bergen Norway. He is also survived by three brothers and three sisters. William Larson is the only member of the family who resides in this city. One brother, Lewis lives in Portland and the other, Nels is in Bergen Norway a sister is in Seattle, Mrs. Bell Olsen and another, Mrs. Annie Lee resides in Britt, Iowa and the third Mrs. Sarah Larkins lives in Chicago. Mr. Larson was born in Norway and 1863
For several years. Mr. Larson has taken an active part in secret orders and is a member of six local lodges, as follows: B.P.O.E. Bellingham Bay Lodge No. 5422; Bellingham Bay Lodge No. 31; Rebekahs Holly Lodge No. 153; Knights of Pytheas Whatcom Lodge No. 109; Modern Woodman of America, Whatcom Camp No. 5198; Fraternal Order of Eagles, Whatcom Aerie No. 131

carl johnson
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jkmarler
Norway Heritage Veteran

USA
7771 Posts

Posted - 10/05/2024 :  18:14:22  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
The search for Sarah Larkins b Norway abt 1856 (if she was Sissel who became Sarah.) has been largely unsuccessful.

I see that there is an Ingeborg with a different birth year from his father's first family. Is her fate known?

Since he was a Modern Woodman of America, and they had to pay out on his account, his file might have been retained, including his application which if it is like the application my great grandfather filled out, may hold actuarial info on living family members age, gender and the like.

Modern Woodmen of America
P.O. Box 2005
Rock Island, IL 61204-2005

Decades ago, when I wrote, they had an actual historian, Gail Levis who responded.
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carl johnson
Medium member

USA
92 Posts

Posted - 11/05/2024 :  15:22:42  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by jkmarler

The search for Sarah Larkins b Norway abt 1856 (if she was Sissel who became Sarah.) has been largely unsuccessful.

I see that there is an Ingeborg with a different birth year from his father's first family. Is her fate known?

Since he was a Modern Woodman of America, and they had to pay out on his account, his file might have been retained, including his application which if it is like the application my great grandfather filled out, may hold actuarial info on living family members age, gender and the like.

Modern Woodmen of America
P.O. Box 2005
Rock Island, IL 61204-2005

Decades ago, when I wrote, they had an actual historian, Gail Levis who responded.


Thank you for all your previous searches concerning Sarah. This obituary also peaked my interest not only about the first Ingeborg that you bring up but the “Lewis” that lived in Portland, Oregon in 1907. I can only assume that that was William’s half brother Lars Larson, born January 07, 1851. I believe he came to North America May 13, 1869?
I will see if there is still a fraternal organization at that address in Illinois. Also, thank you for that information.

carl johnson
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