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Erik Carsten
Advanced member

USA
502 Posts

Posted - 30/10/2009 :  16:47:55  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hi Kċre
I apologize for not posting this information last evening, but I have found the death dates for Anna Sophie and Fredrik Wilhelm Reese. I found them in the digitarkivet under Trondheim Dĝdsfall i Trondheim 1908-1930 (med lakuner)

Fredrik Wilhelm Reese, page 24, number 9

Anna Sophie Reese page 64, number 26


Thank you.

Edited by - Erik Carsten on 30/10/2009 16:52:48
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Kċarto
Norway Heritage Veteran

Norway
4769 Posts

Posted - 30/10/2009 :  19:45:34  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
You are a good investigater.
Not easy to translate. Hope it make sence to you. I start with the father.

Fredrik Reese, former pastry chef.
Age 76.
Died Nov. 5. "Meldt dato" Reported date. Nov. 6. 1908.
Wife Sofie and seven children
Heirs have agreed that the widow does not need to "skifte etter mannen" part the legacy after the husband. (in the rest of her life)

Kċre


Edited by - Kċarto on 31/10/2009 00:24:17
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Kċarto
Norway Heritage Veteran

Norway
4769 Posts

Posted - 30/10/2009 :  20:51:16  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Anne Sofie died at home, same adress since her husband died, Strandveien (Beach road) 19.
Born April 8. 1839.
She died Feb. 13. 1926, the death was reported to the outhorities two days later.
5 children.
"Intet ċ skifte" Similar to: No one exept the children was heirs. (one of those dificult points to translate, law/legal language)
Husband Fredrik died Nov. 5. 1908.

Kċre

Edited by - Kċarto on 30/10/2009 20:53:11
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Kċarto
Norway Heritage Veteran

Norway
4769 Posts

Posted - 31/10/2009 :  00:59:27  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Remember Fredrik and Ane Sophie Reese´s son Mack Ditlef born in Denmark, age 2 in 1865 census for Trondheim.

Max (Mack) Ditlef Reese died March 18. 1914 in Venan?, mentioned ih his wifes Karen Reese´s death record for Trondheim 1926 (Dĝdsfall i Trondheim 1908-1930) page 41, nr 37 (6 children).

In 1900 they lived in Nedre Elvegade (Lower River street) in Steinkjer town with 4 children, Max was on a business trip without recidence location can be specified, occ: Travelers trader in the country side.

Kċre

Edited by - Kċarto on 31/10/2009 01:15:55
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Erik Carsten
Advanced member

USA
502 Posts

Posted - 31/10/2009 :  02:54:48  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hi Kċre

Thank you for that. I am getting a very good picture of Lovise and her past history. There was a very tough stretch there when she lost both her boys and husband within a 3 year period. It had to be devastating. I can tell you, however, that I think the story ended happily ever after as she married and settled in the United States and raised 3 beautiful daughters. Louise and her husband and my great grandparents got along real well I think. One of Lovise's daughters, it was said, made real good cakes. No doubt this is as a result of coming from a family whose father (Fredrik Wilhelm) was a Konditor, Sukkerbager, Drops Fabrikant and Pastry Chef and what else!

I wonder if any of his recipes have survived? I am asking her descendants and if I find any I will share it with you.

Have a great weekend.

Thank you
Erik.
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Kċarto
Norway Heritage Veteran

Norway
4769 Posts

Posted - 31/10/2009 :  17:34:55  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
No wonder she made real good cakes.

She had probably inherited the resipes from Fredrik Reese, ho brought experiences and resipes from Germany via Denmark which he further developed in Norway.

Have a great weeend Erik.

Kċre
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Erik Carsten
Advanced member

USA
502 Posts

Posted - 01/11/2009 :  18:04:03  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Kċarto

Remember Fredrik and Ane Sophie Reese´s son Mack Ditlef born in Denmark, age 2 in 1865 census for Trondheim.

Max (Mack) Ditlef Reese died March 18. 1914 in Venan?, mentioned ih his wifes Karen Reese´s death record for Trondheim 1926 (Dĝdsfall i Trondheim 1908-1930) page 41, nr 37 (6 children).

In 1900 they lived in Nedre Elvegade (Lower River street) in Steinkjer town with 4 children, Max was on a business trip without recidence location can be specified, occ: Travelers trader in the country side.

Kċre
__________________________________-

Any idea at all about the location of his death "Venan"?


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Kċarto
Norway Heritage Veteran

Norway
4769 Posts

Posted - 01/11/2009 :  19:59:01  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I have no idea Erik.
If he died in Norway Venan is a wrongspelling.

Close to Ĝrebro town in Sweden it´s a place called Venan (less likely)

Kċre
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Erik Carsten
Advanced member

USA
502 Posts

Posted - 04/11/2009 :  03:57:57  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Kare, I need a little help in a translation please. I am attaching the weblink to the Trondheim Addressbog for 1893. Please go to page 9 and look at Teodor Helgesen.

It lists his occupation as a "Dreier". Just so you know, his occupation the year prior was listed as fabrikarbeider (Factory worker)

I searched in Norway Heritage for a reference to "Dreier" and there was a post from a few years back and I will copy it here: J

To talk about "svarvar" as wood cutter, sounds wrong to me. Svarvar are an old norwegian word for what in norwegian today are called dreier. That is all about to fasten the piece of woot in a machine and make it rotate, and then make the cutting in it while rotating.

Magne


My question is what do you believe "Dreier" means during this time of 1893?

Trondheim Addressebog 1893. Page 9 (Teodor Helgesen)

Thank you,

Edited by - Erik Carsten on 04/11/2009 04:20:51
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Erik Carsten
Advanced member

USA
502 Posts

Posted - 04/11/2009 :  04:17:35  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I need a little help on another translation please. Can anyone see if there is a occupation and location of employ for the father, named Theodor Andreas Helgesen in the record of his son Knud Martin's birth?

#210 Birth of Knud Martin

Thank you.

Edited by - Erik Carsten on 04/11/2009 04:21:41
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Kċarto
Norway Heritage Veteran

Norway
4769 Posts

Posted - 04/11/2009 :  22:46:53  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Erik,
Svarvar and Dreier is the same word, see here

Kċre.

Edited by - Kċarto on 04/11/2009 22:47:34
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Kċarto
Norway Heritage Veteran

Norway
4769 Posts

Posted - 04/11/2009 :  23:06:43  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Difficult to read Theodors occ.
It´s several words between the two name lines, not sure but the last word looks like "Kirkesanger" Churchsinger.

Kċre
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Erik Carsten
Advanced member

USA
502 Posts

Posted - 05/11/2009 :  00:31:20  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hi Kċre

Try this, easier to read from the Official Register.

#210, Birth of Knud Martin

Can you make out better if there is an occupation and if the father is living somewhere other than Nedre Bakklandet #13?

Thank you.

Erik.
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Erik Carsten
Advanced member

USA
502 Posts

Posted - 05/11/2009 :  00:36:36  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Kċarto

Erik,
Svarvar and Dreier is the same word, see here

Kċre.



Thank you Kare! Very interesting.

Best Regards,
Erik.
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Kċarto
Norway Heritage Veteran

Norway
4769 Posts

Posted - 05/11/2009 :  07:45:04  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hi Erik.
I read it as:
fyrb. omb. pċ "Kong Harald", Fireman, running the steam engine on SS Kong Harald, named after Harald 1.

A photo of Kong Harald (King Harald) from 1911

Kong Harald was build in Germany 1890, lenght 198 foot, 70 beds and sertified for 502 passengers, speed 12 knot, owned by "Nordenfjeldske Dampskipselskap" Nordenfjeldske Steamshipcompany and was inserted in ordinary route 1919 for the company Hurtigruta

From 1906 until the outbreak of WW1 Kong Harald sailed from the Continent regulary to Svalbard

1924 Kong Harald on the way south in dense fog collied with the nortbound Hċkon Jarl outside Bĝdĝ town that sank and 14 of its passengers were killed.

Feb. 17.1929 a fire broke out after leaving Kirkenes town, Finmark County, the ship was repaired, modenized and expanded in Trondheim with more beds,the hull was painted black

During WW2 the ship was almost sunk by torpedoes, once by two Norwegian Torpedo boats from the base on Shetland, an island north of Scotland, erroneously thouhgt it was a German ship transporting cargo or soldiers
2. time a German submarine missed with two torpedoes that passed under the keel of the boat.

Kong Harald was sold to a Dutch company 1951 and was wrecked 1954 in Belgium.

Fredrik Wilhelm Reese, Konditor, Pastry chef and Anne Sofie were Knud Martin´s godparents.

Kċre

Edited by - Kċarto on 05/11/2009 20:39:06
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